Seniors and Mental Health
seniors, senior citizens
mental health
old people
patty pheil  
older americans
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Seniors and Mental Health

"Older Americans"...(Seniors)... "are disproportionately likely to die by suicide.  Comprising only 13 percent of the U.S. population, individuals age 65 and older accounted for 18 percent of all suicide deaths in 2000.  Among the highest rates (when categorized by gender and race) were white men age 85 and older: 59 deaths per 100,000 persons in 2000, more than five times the national U.S. rate of 10.6 per 100,000.

Of the nearly 35 million Americans age 65 and older, an estimated 2 million have a depressive illness (major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, or bipolar disorder) and another 5 million may have 'subsyndromal depression,' or depressive symptoms that fall short of meeting full diagnostic criteria for a disorder. Subsyndromal depression is especially common among older persons and is associated with an increased risk of developing major depression.  In any of these forms, however, depressive symptoms are not a normal part of aging.  In contrast to the normal emotional experiences of sadness, grief, loss, or passing mood states, they tend to be persistent and to interfere significantly with an individual's ability to function. 

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Depression often co-occurs with other serious illnesses such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson’s disease.  Because many older adults face these illnesses as well as various social and economic difficulties, health care professionals may mistakenly conclude that depression is a normal consequence of these problems—an attitude often shared by patients themselves.  These factors together contribute to the underdiagnosis and undertreatment of depressive disorders in older people.  Depression can and should be treated when it co-occurs with other illnesses, for untreated depression can delay recovery from or worsen the outcome of these other illnesses.  The relationship between depression and other illness processes in older adults is a focus of ongoing research." NIMH 

 

 

 

 

 

 



MH Today Attention Deficit Bipolar Borderline Personality Depression
Gender Identity Narcissistic Personality PTSD Schizophrenia Suicide

Visit Mental Health Matters for information and articles. Get help to find a therapist or list your practice; and Psych Forums for message boards on a variety of MH topics.

 

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